Datsun 280Z with a LS3

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

This 1975 Datsun 280Z was built and owned by David Carroll. He has done a fantastic job of turning this classic coupe into a serious autocross contender.

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

Originally David had a 5.7 L LS1 V8 swapped into it but after becoming addicted to autocross racing and wanting more power he soon upgraded to a Tilden Motorsports built LS3. The 6.2 L V8 produces 540 horsepower and 500 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheels.

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

Behind the engine sits a Centerforce DYAD clutch system, T-56 six-speed manual transmission, custom driveshaft, and R200 rear end with 3.54 gears from a Infiniti Q45.

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

The front suspension has been upgraded with a Techno Toy Tuning camber kit and the rear has their SNR200 kit as well. Coilovers with Ridetech springs can be found on every corner along with beefy Wilwood disc brakes. The factory steering rack was tossed for a Silvermine Motorsports electric unit.

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

If the body looks a little different than a factory 280Z that is because David has installed 240Z grill, front and rear bumpers, custom aluminum splitter and spoiler, and JPN Garage super flares.

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

1975 Datsun 280Z with a LS3 V8

Source: Datsun 570Z and @Datsun570z

8 thoughts on “Datsun 280Z with a LS3”

      1. No. I was talking about the trend, not asking to stop writing about them. I don’t remember when was last time I saw Z with something different than LS or 2JZ swap.

        1. To be honest man I completely get it, LSx swaps are a dime a dozen but if you don’t like it or don’t get into it why complain about it? At the end of the day it’s still a engine swap into a different car which is what this site is all about even if one guy (you) doesn’t like 10% of them just because they have LSx engines in em. It’s still the most modern and easy swap out there with tons of support by the aftermarket.

          Cliffs notes: If you don’t like it just move on rather than complaining for the sake of complaining.

        2. Well, there’s a few good reasons why you see so much of the LS and JZ swaps. 1. The 2 engines give cheap reliable power/bang for your buck. AND 2. The aftermarket supports them! I have a 240Z and my initial goal was to put a Robello Stroker in, but then I found out they want 10-15K just for the engine to make 340 hp. That’s not bad for an N/A L-series and it sounds awesome, but the bang for the buck is not there. And I like my BANG! LOL… So I put in an RB25, because the RB26 is more than 2 times the price, just to find out how unreliable they are and how much more $$$ I had to put into it to make it what I wanted it to be. So out came the RB and in went a 2JZ on an even swap moneywise. ZERO problems since with all the power and cost effectiveness I could want. I’ve seen 4,6,8,10 and 12 cyl. engines in “Z’s” pretty “consistently”. Pretty soon you’ve seen them all! But does it pay to spend a boat load of money excessively just to be different??? That’s a personal choice, but not sensible.

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